BrooksLooks @ Hospitality Recruiters

As a young hospitality manager, you may have begun receiving calls from recruiters without knowing they could one day be instrumental in shaping your career. Perhaps you are very happy where you are and generally ignore their calls. I suggest that you will appreciate their calls the day you need them.

The following are points of wisdom, now shared with you that are the result of personal experiences. This is to emphasize how important Hospitality Recruiters can be in helping you to transition out of situations–such as when an owner dies, your property is sold or the economy tanks–and into a new and satisfactory position. You’ll really appreciate your network of recruiter relationships when that day arrives.

  1. Why do I need to communicate with a recruiter when they contact me?

Unless you have a lifetime contract or you are independently wealthy I recommend you thank every recruiter who calls you and begin to establish a relationship with them.

If you are a young hospitality manager, I recommend staying in touch with those recruiters who show an interest in you. Make sure they have your most up-to-date information at all times and if asked, be sure to recommend other colleagues in your network that you feel may be interested and qualified.

  1. What if more than one recruiter is contacting me?

Then you are indeed a lucky person! Each recruiter can present new opportunities. My advice is to get to know each one, and nurture the relationship. Make sure they know exactly what you are looking for. You never know when it will be critically important. Build relationships!

  1. Do I have to tell each recruiter that I am working with other recruiters?

You will need to maintain a very high standard of discretion in working with recruiters, especially when you are working with multiple recruiters. You’ll need to make a judgement call in the event of a conflict, and be the professional. Let the other recruiter know as soon as possible that you are considering other solid offers. You will play games with recruiters at your own peril.

  1. What if I receive multiple offers, from different recruiters–how do I handle this?

The professional recruiter is well qualified and eager to help you negotiate the best compensation package possible. In the event of multiple offers at the same time, be up front about it and follow your heart to the opportunity that is the best match for you. You may need to pursue each offer almost to its conclusion until you are able to make a decision. These can be some real moments of soul searching.

Give feedback to the recruiter, and speak up if something doesn’t feel right. In the end. it’s your deal. Remember that the sooner you can give regrets to the other recruiter, the better and kinder it is. Who knows when you’ll need to reach out to that same recruiter in the future! You will be amazed at what a small community it is of hospitality professionals.

  1. How do I know if a recruiter can help me, and if they are trustworthy, honest and professional?

Word of mouth from your colleagues is important in getting to know the right hospitality recruiters. The Recruiter’s job is one of complete discretion, and they wouldn’t last long if they divulged information that jeopardized a candidate’s current position or future opportunities. Remember that they are generally on your side, are only paid when you are hired, and usually only when you are employed for a minimum period of time. In the event you don’t work out, they may be required to perform another search without additional compensation.

  1. What does a recruiter most need from me?

Honesty and integrity. A full disclosure of your skills and talents. Updated résumés and updated professional references. Referrals to strong candidates.

  1. Should I keep in touch with recruiters, or am I just bothering them?

If you are personally in a search mode, regular contact shows that you are enthusiastically interested in working with them. The recruiter will let you know if you are overdoing it. Remember that your other full time job is marketing yourself.

  1. How do I negotiate offers through the recruiter?

I have found that top recruiters are expert at this.They will help you assemble your minimum requirements for the job well in advance. Often, the recruiter will back away and let you handle the negotiation. Use the recruiter as a consultant and take your time. Much more goes into salary negotiations than just a few numbers.

  1. What if I feel the recruiter isn’t presenting me accurately?

Sometimes it doesn’t seem like the recruiter has a clear picture of your experience. You need to speak up, defend yourself or better present yourself to him or her. The recruiter is only trying to present you and your skills to their client in the best possible way. The ball is in your court. You should also have a complete understanding of the process the recruiter will go through in representing you to clients.

Don’t let a recruiter entice you with pie in the sky job opportunities or the fact that he/she will be blanketing your resume all over in order to gain greater visibility for you. This indicates the recruiter’s level of professionalism and how they go about their work.

  1. What if a recruiter doesn’t call me back?

Move on. Life is short. Be tenacious in introducing yourself to other recruiters that might be a better fit for you. You’ll find plenty of recruiters (and people) who aren’t interested in getting to know you, or who will make you feel like you don’t amount to much anyway. They simply need to weed you out from the pack as quickly as possible. Don’t take it personally. They have a job to do too. Be tenacious and move on.

Good luck!

© Copyright 2017 Brooks Bradbury / BrooksLooks

 

About Brooks Bradbury / BrooksLooks

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